7-Eleven Launches Japan Disaster Relief Campaign

“We want to connect with our customers around the world to assist Japan and its people in rebuilding their lives after such devastating disasters,” says 7-Eleven CEO.

The global chain of 7-Eleven is raising funds in close to 39,000 store locations to assist organizations providing relief for the Japanese people devastated by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami.

The world’s largest convenience retailer has launched an in-store collection canister and fundraising campaign for its customers around the world to assist with Japan relief.

Dallas-based 7-Eleven is owned by Seven-Eleven Japan in Tokyo, which operates and franchises more than 13,200 stores on the island nation.

“This tragedy has been unfolding before our eyes, and people are looking to support the Japanese people in any way they can,” said Joe DePinto, 7-Eleven Inc. president and CEO.  “We want to connect with our customers around the world to assist Japan and its people in rebuilding their lives after such devastating disasters.”

DePinto added, “Funds collected will go to organizations in Japan that provide rescue and recovery, safety and rebuilding services.  7-Eleven will make a company contribution as well.”

7-Eleven encouraged its franchisees, domestic and international licensees to join the campaign, and the request was met with resounding support.

In addition to 7-Eleven’s U.S. and Canada operations, stores participating in the 7-Eleven global effort are located in: Japan, Thailand, Taiwan, South Korea, Mexico, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore and Indonesia.

Customers who want to support relief efforts in Japan can conveniently make a donation by stopping at a participating 7-Eleven store and dropping their change or a donation in a collection canister designated for Japan Relief.

Additionally, 15 third-party bakery operations that make fresh donuts, bagels, croissants and similar items delivered daily to approximately 6,000 U.S. and Canadian 7-Eleven stores have pledged a contribution to a disaster-relief organization in Japan.

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